1. What is Bayhem?

    (Spoiler: It’s all West Side Story's fault)

  2. lizdexia:

    livefromnew-york:

    improvinator:

    A very old, VHS copy of Dratch & Fey.

    GUYS THIS IS A HUGE FUCKING DEAL . REBLOG THe shit out of it

    Well this is exciting and I’m excited to watch it.

  3. "Lilac," Eno + Hyde

    Had this song on repeat all day, can’t stop listening to it. There’s also a great New Yorker bio of Brian Eno / review of his recent collabs with Karl Hyde from Underworld.

    I have a trick that I used in my studio, because I have these twenty-eight-hundred-odd pieces of unreleased music, and I have them all stored in iTunes… When I’m cleaning up the studio… I just have it playing on random shuffle. And so, suddenly, I hear something and often I can’t even remember doing it.. and then, years later, on the random shuffle, this thing comes up, and I think, Wow, I didn’t hear it when I was doing it. And I think that often happens—we don’t actually hear what we’re doing. . . . I often find pieces and I think, This is genius. Which me did that? Who was the me that did that?

  4. 7 July 2014

    92 notes

    Reblogged from
    ariscott

    Maude Advice, Part 1: Submitting as a Writer →

    ariscott:

    This will be a UCB-specific post, as the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre is where I’ve had my experience. But I hope a lot of what I write can be useful to anyone writing sketch comedy or submitting writing packets.

    This is all based on my personal experience. I don’t work for UCB, I’m not a…

    Lots of good stuff here, time to work on my Maude packet.

  5. improvartvice:

- Johnny Meeks

I got to take a DCM workshop with Johnny Meeks last week. He’s a great teacher, and really nice guy. If you haven’t heard him talk about ‘Por Las Buenas,” check out this episode of Improv Obsession.
In a nutshell, it’s about playing the “best version” of ourselves onstage. Trying to be a good person can be, essentially, a built-in justification for why the straight man stays in a scene.
Example: Player A initiates as a Mormon missionary knocking at the door. One option for Player B is to say, “I’m an atheist. I think your beliefs are insane - dangerous, even. You’re never going to convert me.” Immediately we start with a disagreement / argument.
Another example: Player A initiates as the Mormon missionary. Player B can still be an atheist, and still have no intention of being converted. But, instead of posing this as a challenge/argument, Player B says, “Wow, the stuff you believe is fascinating! Please, come in and tell me more! I don’t plan to convert, but I want to hear all about these things you believe.”
Being into the other person and their thing - even while labeling it as unusual or crazy - gives us a reason to be, and stay, in that scene. Find a way to be cool to each other, and you’ll find ways to propel the scene forward.

    improvartvice:

    - Johnny Meeks

    I got to take a DCM workshop with Johnny Meeks last week. He’s a great teacher, and really nice guy. If you haven’t heard him talk about ‘Por Las Buenas,” check out this episode of Improv Obsession.

    In a nutshell, it’s about playing the “best version” of ourselves onstage. Trying to be a good person can be, essentially, a built-in justification for why the straight man stays in a scene.

    Example: Player A initiates as a Mormon missionary knocking at the door. One option for Player B is to say, “I’m an atheist. I think your beliefs are insane - dangerous, even. You’re never going to convert me.” Immediately we start with a disagreement / argument.

    Another example: Player A initiates as the Mormon missionary. Player B can still be an atheist, and still have no intention of being converted. But, instead of posing this as a challenge/argument, Player B says, “Wow, the stuff you believe is fascinating! Please, come in and tell me more! I don’t plan to convert, but I want to hear all about these things you believe.”

    Being into the other person and their thing - even while labeling it as unusual or crazy - gives us a reason to be, and stay, in that scene. Find a way to be cool to each other, and you’ll find ways to propel the scene forward.

  6. Worries →

    shrinepocket:

    Many times, we are plagued by worries and doubts as we go through our days. We allow our troubles to weigh us down, like rocks tied to a corpse in a river. Only, the rocks aren’t tied to us, we’re just holding on to them, and that’s what’s making us sink. If we just let go of these rocks, we can…

    Lot of profound insights being shared over at http://shrinepocket.tumblr.com

  7. Try to live without resort to per­severance. But writing is all about ­perseverance. You’ve got to stick at it. In my 30s I used to go to the gym even though I hated it. The purpose of ­going to the gym was to postpone the day when I would stop going. That’s what writing is to me: a way of ­postponing the day when I won’t do it any more, the day when I will sink into a depression so profound it will be indistinguishable from perfect bliss.

    — Geoff Dyer (http://www.advicetowriters.com/home/2014/5/25/geoff-dyers-10-rules-for-writing-fiction.html)

  8. 28 May 2014

    1,441 notes

    Reblogged from
    cameos

    Christina’s World

    Christina’s World

    (Source: cameos)

  9. theonion:

‘No Way To Prevent This,’ Says Only Nation Where This Regularly Happens

    theonion:

    ‘No Way To Prevent This,’ Says Only Nation Where This Regularly Happens